The mining industry is the largest customer for Canada’s transportation sector

Photo courtesy of Imperial Metals Corp.

Mining Facts

Facts at Your Fingertips

The Mining Facts section is designed for your use as a quick reference tool presenting the most important and most currently available facts about the mining sector in British Columbia and Canada.

Mining Facts

Gross mining revenues for the BC mining industry were $ 8.2 billion in 2014.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
In 2014, the BC mining industry made total payments to the government and government agencies of $467 million, an decrease from $511 million in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
British Columbia’s mining industry pre-tax net earnings for 2014 were $288 million, a significant decrease from 2013's $1.387 billion.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Hiring requirements for all mining sectors in BC, over the next 10 years, are projected to be 16,770 workers under a baseline scenario
British Columbia Hiring Requirements and Available Talent Forecasts: Exploration, Mining, and Stone, Sand, & Gravel 2012
The number of people working in BC's mining industry in 2014 decreased to 9,954 down from 10,720 in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Capital expenditures fell to $1.5 billion in 2014 from $1.8 billion in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Vancouver is the world’s leading centre of expertise for mineral exploration. Some 1,200 exploration companies are located in British Columbia, most in the greater Vancouver area
Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014
Exploration and development expenditures was $338 million down from $476 million in 2013.  
Ministry of Energy and Mines
Lead revenue totalled $162 million in 2014 compared to $189 million in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Shipments of metallurgical coal dropped to 26.3 million tonnes in 2014, compared to 28.1 million tonnes in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Coal accounted for 41% of the total volume handled at the Port of Vancouver in 2013, which moves shipments to China, Japan and other Asian markets.
Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014
Metallurgical coal and copper shared the lead for net revenues in  BC's mining sector in 2014 at 32% each, followed by zinc at 10%, silver and gold at 7% each, molybdenum at 4%, thermal coal & misc at 3% each, and lead at 2%.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Copper revenue increased to $2.2 billion in 2014 and copper shipments rose to 997,000 tonnes.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Gold: net mining revenues increased in 2014 to $461 million, up from $304 million in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Molybdenum: net mining revenues in 2014 increased to $256 million from $150 million in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Zinc and zinc concentrates revenue in 2014 rose to $711 million from $628 million in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Silver: net mining revenue for 2014 was down to $487 million compared to $626 million in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Cash flow from BC operations decreased in 2014 to $1.7 billion, from $2.6 billion in 2013.
PwC Proving Resilient : The mining industry in British Columbia 2014
Mine reclamation is a fundamental part of the mining life cycle in British Columbia. The Technical & Research Committee on Reclamation (TRCR) has been dedicated to excellence in mine reclamation in B.C. since 1977.
Technical and Research Committe on Reclamation

The mining industry and Canada’s rail system have an important relationship—the industry provided 52% of rail freight revenues in 2013. In terms of volume, rail remained dependent on mining in 2013, with 46% ofits commodity volume comining from mining.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

The coal industry was responsible for approximately 42,030 direct and indirect jobs across Canada & represented  $2,606 billion in wages and salaries

PwC: Economic Impact Analysis of the Coal Mining Industry in Canada 2012

As of 2011 there are twenty-three producing coal mines in Canada; 10 producing metallurgical coal, 13 thermal coal and one mine producing both

PwC: Economic Impact Analysis of the Coal Mining industry in Canada 2012

Coal producing provinces in Canada are: Britsh Columbia, Alberta, Saskatechewan and Nova Scotia

PwC: Economic Impact Analysis of the Coal Mining industry in Canada 2012

The industry contributed $54 billion to Canada’s gross domestic product in 2013; this included $22 billion in mineral extraction and over $32 billion in mineral processing and manufacturing.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

In 2011 the coal industry contributed $5 billion to Canada's GDP

PwC: Economic Impact Analysis of the Coal Mining industry in Canada 2012

Total tax revenue from coal mining in Canada in 2011 was approximately $698 million; added to this, $344 million was reported as mineral royalties and mineral land taxes

PwC: Economic Impact Analysis of the Coal Mining industry in Canada 2012

Total mining establishments across Canada in 2013 were 1,262. Of this group, metal mines numbered 75 and non-metals 1,187. The provinces with the most metal mines are: Quebec with 24, Ontario with 19 and British Columbia with 9.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Canada has a large mineral-processing industry, with 30 non-ferrous metal smelters and refineries in six provinces

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Canada ranks among the top five countries in the global production of 11 major minerals and metals

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

The mining industry needs 12,100 new workers each year over the next decade to replace current positions and fill new ones to meet baseline production targets.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Canada's mining industry plans to invest $160 billion in projects over the next decade, with multiple billions in each of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

According to the Mining Industry Human Resources Council, the Canadian mining industry will require 121,000 workers over the next decade. This deficit is compounded
by the approaching retirement of the industry’s skilled core of workers. By 2024, MiHR forecasts more than 53,000 employees will retire from the sector.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

The average annual pay for a mining worker in 2013 exceeded $110,000, which surpassed the average annual earnings of workers in forestry, manufacturing, finance and construction by a range of $31,000 to $46,000 for those sectors. This wage gap has remained relatively consistent in recent years.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

The mining industry employed 383,140 people in 2013, representing 1 in every 47 Canadian jobs.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

The Canadian mining industry boasts the highest wages and salaries of all industrial sectors in Canada

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Internationally, Canada is one of the leading mining countries and one of the largest producers of minerals and metals. The industry accounted for 19.6% of the value of Canadian goods exports in 2013 selling a diversified array of minerals abroad. Exports of aluminum, copper, gold, iron and steel, iron ore, nickel, silver, uranium, zinc,diamonds, potash and coal ranged from $1.5 billion to $17.7 billion each.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Canadian mining and metals companies invested $522 million in research and development (R&D) in 2013.  The industry also employs over 4,700 people in R&D in 2012.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Vancouver features the world’s leading cluster of exploration companies; Montreal is home to major aluminum and iron ore firms. Toronto is the global hub for mining finance. Edmonton is the global centre for oil sands expertise, Saskatoon for uranium and potash.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Canada is the leading global centre for mining finance. The Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) and TSX Venture handled 48% of the world's mining equity transactions in 2013.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

The mining industry is the leading customer of Canadian ports.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Canada slipped from the world’s top destination for exploration spending in 2012 to the second spot behind Australia in 2013. Canada’s percentage of global mineral investment dropped from 18% in 2011 to 13% in 2013, which is indicative of the fierce competition for global mineral investment.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

In 2013, exploration investment fell year-over-year by 41% to $2.3 billion. Precious metals attracted the lion’s share of Canadian exploration spending again in 2013, accounting for 48%
overall.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Proportionally, the mining industry is the largest private sector employer of Aboriginal Canadians. According to Statistics Canada, the number of Aboriginal people employed in the mining sector increased by 14% to 10,300 people from 2007 to 2012.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014

Historically, the value of minerals and metals to Canada’s economy has ranged between 2.7% and 4.5% of the country’s GDP. In 2013, the industry’s contribution remained within this range at 3.4%.

Mining Association of Canada, Facts & Figures 2014